WILDFLOWER SIGHTINGS ABOUND AMONG TEXAS HILL COUNTRY WINERIES

Wildflower safaris in the Texas Hill Country are a true staple of spring. Add in the verdant vineyards and rich histories of the region’s many wineries, and a wine and wildflower experience will afford you an opportunity to indulge in a gratifying and memorable stimulation of the senses.

 

A MEMORABLE JOURNEY

This year’s Wine & Wildflower Journey runs from April 6 to April 22, and it features 42 participating wineries. From the colorful Texas bluebonnets that hug rolling country lanes to sprawling fields of lavender, Texas Hill Country wineries offer wildflower viewing and photo opportunities that are not to be missed.

Where you find grape vines, you’ll often find bluebonnets, since both thrive in well-drained soil. The 2018 bluebonnet season looks particularly promising. The Dallas News says, “Heavy summer rains, a dry fall and a cool winter are all good signs for bluebonnet watchers in Central Texas.”

The Texas state flower is actually a lupine known as Lupinus texensis, one of the two primary species found in Texas and nowhere else in the world. Flower spikes feature blossoms tipped in white, like a bunny’s tail. Historian Jack Maguire aptly observed that “the bluebonnet is to Texas what the shamrock is to Ireland, the cherry blossom to Japan, the lily to France, the rose to England and the tulip to Holland.”

As you traverse the Hill Country on your way from one winery to another, you’ll also encounter other colorful species like phlox, lemon mint, standing cypress, winecups, coreopsis, strawflowers, Mexican hats and Indian blankets. Bright white prickly poppies and their contrasting golden cores delight the eye, as do the brilliant orange flowers of the Indian paintbrush.

 

WINERIES AND WILDFLOWERS

Although you’ll find bountiful displays of ubiquitous Texas bluebonnets along roadways and in sun-drenched meadows, there are also wonderful gardens and even lavender fields to be enjoyed at various Texas Hill wineries. Here’s a brief sampling of what you’ll encounter:

 

FALL CREEK VINEYARDS AT TOW

The very first Texas Hill Country winery is the Fall Creek Vineyards at Tow, established in 1975. Here, you can wander the gardens as you survey the beautiful 400-acre expanse located just northwest of Lake Buchanan.

 

BECKER VINEYARDS

Becker Vineyards in the Stonewall area is both a winery and a lavish lavender farm. The profusion of color at Becker Vineyards is breathtaking. During a trip to France, Bunny and Dr. Richard Becker were inspired by the rolling fields of lavender, so much so that they planted their own. From April to May, 4,000 lavender plants dazzle the eye at this Stonewall-area winery.

As you tour Hill Country wineries, particularly in the areas around Fredericksburg and Blanco, you’ll find other rolling lavender fields awash in the brilliant purple blossoms. Lavender farming takes advantage of the perfect combination of a drier climate and an alkaline limestone growing medium.

 

STONE HOUSE VINEYARD

Spring at Stone House Vineyard is accentuated by emerging foliage and flowers set against a sparkling Lake Travis backdrop. The Spicewood-area facility is solidly constructed of massive limestone blocks.

 

WEDDING OAK WINERY

Finally, at Wedding Oak Winery, at Wildseed Farms Fredericksburg location, 200 acres of flowering fields make it the largest working wildflower farm in the country. Here, red poppies are among the flowers that complement the bluebonnet displays. Acres of gardens are frequented by humans and butterflies alike.

 

MAKE THE MOST OUT OF TEXAS WILDFLOWER SEASON

Take the Wine and Wildflower Journey, and you’ll discover why the Texas Hill Country is indeed Texas Wine Country. To plan a trip to the area or for more information about our wine and wildflower event, please contact us.

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