Stop and Smell the Wildflowers in Texas Hill Country

Seeing the bluebonnets in bloom is a gorgeous sight in The Texas Hill Country. Each year in early April, we see several Texans flock to find the best spot to take in these beautiful flowers. While our annual Wine and Wildflower Journey isn’t taking place this spring, we invite you to join us from July 31 – August 16 in the picturesque Texas Hill Country, sipping and sampling award-winning wines at 52 unique Hill Country Wineries for our Wine Journey. In the meantime, beat the cabin fever by taking a trip outdoors to visit the native wildflowers in Texas Hill Country. While the bluebonnets are our state’s claim to fame, don’t forget about other blooming wildflowers like the Indian paintbrush, Indian blanket, pink evening primrose, Mexican hat, wine cups, black-eyed Susan, coreopsis, and more. As per the CDC suggestions, be sure to stay a safe 6-foot distance from others as you take in the scenery. While several locations are closed, we’ve rounded up some of our favorites and best-known spots that are still available to visit. As you venture out, be sure to stop at your favorite local winery for a curbside pick up of wine for your wildflower picnic or to enjoy back at home! 

 

Bluebonnet House – Marble Falls, TX 

Built-in the mid-19th century, the Bluebonnet house has two-stories of limestone and in early spring is surrounded by fields of bluebonnets. Head out to Marble Falls the turn right off of Highway 281 North after you pass through the town. The scenery is gorgeous, and the vibrant color of the wildflowers make for stunning photos and a breathtaking view. Enjoy the juxtaposition of old world history and newly sprung flowers.

Wineries on the way: 

*Please check this sheet, call, or visit each winery to ensure they are open and provide curbside pickup.*

 

Pedernales State Park and Milton Reimers Ranch Park

Pedernales State Park may be closed, but the entrance to this state park is blooming! You’ll see bluebonnets, pink evening primroses, and winecups. Be sure to stay safe and keep a 6-foot distance if others are also enjoying the flowers. Another beautiful Texas park is Milton Reimers Ranch Park. Allot an entire day as there is plenty to explore with several hiking and biking trails, along with a river. As an added benefit, you’ll pass several wineries as you drive out and back from the park! 

Wineries on the way: 

*Please check this sheet, call, or visit each winery to ensure they are open and provide curbside pickup.*

 

Willow City Loop – Willow City, TX

Just outside of Fredericksburg, Will City loop is a 13-mile two-lane stretch of some of the best wildflowers in Texas.  Take State Highway 16 North from Fredericksburg approximately 13 miles and turn east on Ranch Road 1323 to Willow City. Roadside property along this route is private, so no wandering into the fields. Stay in the car or park to walk this stunning color-cloaked stretch of road. You’ll see everything from bluebonnets and Indian paintbrush to firewheels and poppies.

Wineries on the way: 

*Please check this sheet, call, or visit each winery to ensure they are open and provide curbside pickup.*

 

Kerrville, TX 

At the southern end of the Texas Hill Country lies Kerrville, a small Texas town of 20,000 that sits on the Edwards Plateau ecoregion. The beauty of Kerrville is evident with its rugged stony hills, broad divides, rangy cedar, towering cypress, and the beautiful Guadalupe River. In springtime, the town comes to life as the wildflowers bloom along the highway. 

Wineries on the way: 

*Please check this sheet, call, or visit each winery to ensure they are open and provide curbside pickup.*

 

Bring a little brightness to your day by getting outside with a day trip to see the beauty of Texas wildflowers! Although picking wildflowers isn’t illegal, we don’t recommend it. Leave them for others to enjoy and for our great pollinating critters, who help spread seeds to ensure next year’s bloom is even better. Also, be mindful of where you step. In the same way that we don’t want you to pick flowers, we also don’t want you to trample them. Crushing plants repeatedly can destroy the flowers. Keep an eye out for fire ants and other critters that may be enjoying the wildflowers too. Let’s keep Texas beautiful! To stay up to date on the latest bloom news, give the Texas Department of Transportation Wildflower Hotline (800-452-9292) before your trip for even more up-to-date information.